Samyuktagama 215

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Saṃyuktāgama 215. [Discourse to Puṇṇa]

Thus have I heard. At one time the Buddha was staying at Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park.

At that time a monk, the venerable Puṇṇa, approached the Buddha, paid respect with his head at the Buddha’s feet, withdrew to stand to one side, and said to the Buddha: “The Blessed One teaches the Dharma that is directly visible, he teaches the extinction of the fire, he teaches what is immediate, he teaches what leads onward, he teaches what is to be seen right here, he teaches what is to be realized in dependence on oneself. Blessed One, what is the Dharma that is directly visible … up to … what is to be realized in dependence on oneself?”

The Buddha said to Puṇṇa: “It is well, Puṇṇa, that you are able to make this inquiry. Puṇṇa, listen and pay proper attention to what I shall teach you.

“Puṇṇa, on having seen forms with the eye, a monk experiences the forms and he experiences that there is lust for the forms: ‘within me there is lust for forms cognized by the eye.’ He knows it as it really is that ‘within me there is lust for forms cognized by the eye.’

“Puṇṇa, on seeing forms with the eye and experiencing the forms, one who experiences lust for the forms and knows as it really is that ‘within me there is lust for forms cognized by the eye’, this is called a directly visible teaching.

“What is the extinction of the fire? What is immediate? What leads onward? What is to be seen right here? What is to be realized in dependence on oneself?

“Puṇṇa, on having seen forms with the eye, a monk experiences the forms and he experiences that lust for forms does not arise. He knows as it really is that ‘within me there is no lust for forms cognized by the eye, I experience no arising of lust for forms.’

“Puṇṇa, suppose on having seen forms with the eye, a monk experiences the forms, and experiences that lust for forms does not arise, and he knows form as it really is. Knowing as it really is that he experiences no arising of lust for forms, this is called the extinction of the fire, immediate, leading onward, to be seen right here, and what is to be realized in dependence on oneself.

"The ear … the nose … the tongue … the body … the mind is also like that.”

When the Buddha had spoken this discourse, hearing what the Buddha had said the monk Puṇṇa was delighted and received it respectfully.