Samyuktagama 62

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Saṃyuktāgama

62. Discourse on Lustful Attachment

Thus have I heard. At one time the Buddha was staying at Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park.

At that time the Blessed One said to the monks: “There are five aggregates of clinging, that is, the bodily form aggregate of clinging … the feeling … the perception … the formations … the consciousness aggregate of clinging.

“A foolish unlearned worldling, who is ignorant and without wisdom, in regard to the five aggregates of clinging gives rise to the view of self, which is a tie of attachment and a mental tendency to bondage that gives rise to lustful desires.

“Monks, a learned noble disciple, who has knowledge and wisdom, in regard to these five aggregates of clinging does not have the view of self, which is a tie of attachment and a mental tendency to bondage that gives rise to lustful desires.

“How does a foolish unlearned worldling, who is ignorant and without wisdom, in regard to the five aggregates of clinging have the view of self, which is a tie of attachment and a mental tendency to bondage that gives rise to lustful desires?

“Monks, a foolish unlearned worldling, who is ignorant and without wisdom, sees bodily form as the self, as distinct from the self in the sense of being owned by it, as existing within the self, or a self as existing within bodily form. In the same way he sees feeling … perception … formations … consciousness as the self, as distinct from the self in the sense of being owned by it, as existing within the self, or a self as existing within consciousness. In this way a foolish unlearned worldling, who is ignorant and without wisdom, in regard to the five aggregates of clinging proclaims a self, which is a tie of attachment and a mental tendency to bondage that gives rise to lustful desires.

“Monks, how does a learned noble disciple, who has knowledge and wisdom, not proclaim a self, which is a tie of attachment and a mental tendency to bondage that gives rise to lustful desires? A learned noble disciple does not see bodily form as the self, as distinct from the self in the sense of being owned by it, as existing within the self, or a self as existing within bodily form. In the same way he does not see feeling … perception … formations … consciousness as the self, as distinct from the self in the sense of being owned by it, as existing within the self, or a self as existing within consciousness. In this way a learned noble disciple, who has knowledge and wisdom, in regard to the five aggregates of clinging does not have the view of a self, which is a tie of attachment and a mental tendency to bondage that gives rise to lustful desires.

“Whatever bodily form, whether past, future or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, sublime or repugnant, far or near, all such bodily form he rightly contemplates as all being entirely impermanent. In the same way whatever feeling … perception … formations … consciousness, whether past, future or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, sublime or repugnant, far or near, all such consciousness he rightly contemplates as all being entirely impermanent.”

When the Buddha had spoken this discourse, the monks, hearing what the Buddha had said, were delighted and received it respectfully.